The author of three critically acclaimed and well-respected books, Art T. Burton has spent the better part of 20 years reclaiming the heritage of African Americans in the American West. Burton has a distinguished career in education and the arts. He received bachelor and masters degrees in cultural and ethnic studies at Governors State University (GSU), where he served as student assistant dean. Additionally, he was selected as a recipient of “Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities,” and traveled to Brazil with GSU’s award-winning Jazz Band as their percussionist.

Cover of "Black Buckskin and Blue" Cover of "Black, Red and Deadly" Cover of "Black Gun, Silver Star"

"Bad News For Outlaws""Congratulations to my friend, author Vaunda Nelson for awards and achievements for her new children’s book on Bass Reeves. I think all parents who want to celebrate United States history should consider this book for their children. During the development of the book, I gladly assisted Vaunda with research information on Reeves." - Art

The book can be perused at the following site: http://www.lernerbooks.com/badnews/ .

 


WHAT OTHERS SAY ABOUT HIS BOOKS AND LECTURES:

“(Black, Red, and Deadly: Black and Indian Gunfighters of the Indian Territories, 1870-1907) is a meaningful addition to my library, especially with the recent dedication of the Buffalo Soldier Monument. Your book illuminates another exciting chapter in the story of the outstanding contributions made by African Americans to our Nation's history.”

- Colin L. Powell,
65th United States Secretary of State, American statesman and a
retired four-star general in the United States Army.

. . .

“For my fellow writer, Art T. Burton, who has given us a real marshal of Parker’s Court, Bass Reeves, with admiration.”

- Charles Portis,
author of True Grit, the novel, which was made into a movie starring John Wayne,
also an upcoming movie adaption by the Coen Brothers, he remarked about Black Gun, Silver Star.

. . .

“Thank you for telling those stories to us. They are an important part of United States history.”

- Sterling B. Epps,
Special Assistant to the Director-Congressional Affairs, U.S. Department of Justice

. . .

“Burton’s true tales about Black men of iron resolve such as U.S. Deputy Marshal Bass Reeves are a breakthrough for minority groups who often feel left out of the dominant American myth of the cowboy. Burton might have focused on Reeves alone, but his wider view includes many more Indian and Black gunfighters, lawmen, outlaws....”

- Michael Martin Murphy,
Cowboy Singer & Songwriter, Albuquerque Journal

. . .

“Those who attended (your lecture) really loved hearing about your research and stories of the Wild West. Your accomplishments are very impressive!”

- Eileen Morrow,
Office of Black Student Affairs College of Wooster

. . .

“Art T. Burton’s homage to the Black lawmen and outlaws who populated the old West...”

- Ebony Magazine